Making Sense of Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain

…a tidal wave of chronic illness…

The New York Times – September 9, 2009

That’s what medical students experienced when they spent a summer observing the real-world environment of community medical practice:  “A tidal wave of chronic illness” overwhelming patients and the overworked doctors trying to help.

How can you find your way through the chaos of chronic pain or another long-term illness and re-emerge with a healthy future to look forward to?

It won’t be easy.

Dr. Jeffrey Moss is one of the nutrition authorities I turn to to learn more about the causes and treatment of chronic illness.  He offers extensive educational materials for doctors – including newsletters, web postings, and seminars.  He’s constantly combing through the mountains of research on nutrition and chronic conditions.

“There’s an “expanding group of chronically ill patients truly becoming a “500 pound gorilla in the room” in that, despite being treated repeatedly for their illnesses, they rarely “get better.”  In contrast, they receive an endless amount of treatments for the ongoing acute exacerbations of their relentless, never ending, ever expanding list of chronic ailments that form “a ball and chain” that they drag with them for months and years.” (Dr. Moss)

How do we respond to this epidemic of chronic pain and other ailments?  There’s one approach that’s doomed to fail…

“Treatment based on symptoms – This is often impractical and of questionable efficacy in chronically ill patients.  Why?  Chronically ill patients, for the most part, present with highly complex, highly varied lists of signs, symptoms, and diagnoses that make efficacy more difficult to attain and patient compliance a challenge due to issues of practicality (and finances).” (Dr. Moss)

On a similar note, treatment based on traditional medical definitions of individual “diseases” (such as diabetes, thyroid deficiency, etc.) is also likely to be ineffective.  Chronic problems are complex, multifactorial, and overwhelming — both for the patient and the fragmented health care system.

To his credit, Dr. Moss – even though he makes a living by selling high quality nutrition supplements to doctors’ offices – also sees the limitations of fancy nutrition testing and supplementation protocols:

  • The process is too convoluted.
  • Not all of the diagnostic tests  are widely accepted within the medical world.
  • The supplement regimens can get out of control, with patients swallowing scores of pills morning, noon, and night.
  • It’s expensive, and
  • In the end, just like with any other medical procedure, you still have to wait and see what results you get, and then modify your program accordingly.

Over the past year and a half, Dr. Moss has shared with his readers (including me) an important insight about the catastrophe of chronic illness.

In reviewing the research literature, he was struck by the similarities between

  • chronic pain (and other debilitating conditions like chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, diabetes, stenosis, multiple chemical sensitivities, arthritis, back pain, and so forth) and
  • the problems of patients hospitalized with severe, acute diseases

It turns out that there are lots of scientific journal articles about the metabolic and physiological responses to severe, acute illness.  Dr. Moss had the insight to sift through the literature to discover how these acute phase responses – which are beneficial, natural defenses – can morph into chronic pain and its sister disorders.

And how nutritional and lifestyle interventions – based on the simplest possible tests combined with old-fashioned common sense — can begin to make a big difference.

You’ll be hearing more about this topic in future articles.

Meantime, I’ve developed a 10-step process of “guided self-care” that anyone can use to help rebound from chronic illness.  I’ve begun making it available to my patients and will now be offering it online to my e-mail subscribers too.

It’s not medical (or chiropractic) treatment.  It’s self-care.  But it’s an organized, guided  plan of self-care.

Find out more about Dr. Lavine’s Ten Step Program to Conquer Chronic Illness.  Or send me an e-mail at drlavine@askdrlavine.com, or call me at 212-400-9663.

Share

About Ronald Lavine, D.C.

Dr. Lavine has more than thirty years' experience helping patients alleviate pain and restore health using diverse, scientifically-based manual therapy and therapeutic exercise and alignment methods. His website, askdrlavine.com, provides more information about his approach. Please contact him at drlavine@yourbodyofknowledge.com or at 212-400-9663.
This entry was posted in Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Making Sense of Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain

  1. Pingback: Gene Linked to Chronic Pain

Comments are closed.