This quick enjoyment of life quiz predicts your longevity

I enjoy the things that I do

  • Never
  • Rarely
  • Sometimes
  • Often

I enjoy being in the company of others

  • Never
  • Rarely
  • Sometimes
  • Often

On balance, I look back on my life with a sense of happiness

  • Never
  • Rarely
  • Sometimes
  • Often

I feel full of energy these days

  • Never
  • Rarely
  • Sometimes
  • Often

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It’s more fundamental to health than good nutrition

What could be more fundamental to your health than good nutrition?

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Altered Sense of Humor an Early Warning Sign of Dementia

man laughingTo laugh is human…….

Our scientific understanding of the role of a sense of humor as part of health is growing. What’s also emerging is an understanding that a shift in the types of things that make you laugh can be a clue to a change in mental abilities.

A 2016 article in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease reported on the results of a questionnaire about humor preferences.

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Running is healthy for your knees

The traditional argument against running was that the pounding of running compacts your knee cartilage and speeds up the process of arthritis.

Here’s the counterargument: cartilage becomes healthier when it’s subject to cycles of loading and unloading. Since a large fraction of your knee cartilage has no direct blood supply, the only way to get nutrition into the cartilage (and flush waste products out) is to repeatedly squeeze and then release the tissue, just like wringing water out of a sponge.

The anti-running argument has always had numerous holes. For one thing, it’s been hard to document the negative effects of running in a scientific laboratory. And long term studies show that runners don’t have an increased incidence of knee arthritis.

Now the pro-running argument has gained even more support.

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New clues in chronic fatigue syndrome

If you have chronic fatigue syndrome, you confront a paradox: physical activity is helpful, but exercise can also backfire and leave you totally exhausted. You might feel burning or aching in your muscles as if you’ve run a marathon even when you’ve only walked around the block.

This hallmark of chronic fatigue has a scientific name: “post-exertional malaise.” Post-exertional malaise is considered one of the symptoms that officially defines the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome.

Now scientists have discovered a clue about the energy metabolism of people suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome that might account for post-exertional malaise.

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Reverse Hip Joint Arthritis

I’m on a mission to make hip joint degeneration a relic of the past.

Many of my patients have benefitted from a program that slows the processes that grind down the hip joint, reverses some of the accumulated damage, and prevents or delays the need to have hip joint replacement surgery.

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Harm Reduction vs. Restoring Health: Why Blood Pressure Pills Don’t Make You Healthier

Whenever I see my personal medical doctor I’m reminded of the differences between the allopathic medical philosophy and the chiropractic perspective.

“If you’re not able to control your blood pressure with lifestyle changes,” she was telling me, “You should take blood pressure medication to improve your health.”  Why did this statement sound off-base to me?

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Love exercise? Loathe exercise? Is it in your genes?

I’ve spent my entire career trying to inspire people to enjoy the pleasures of body movement. That’s one of the reasons I organized the 2016 Princeton Fitness Challenge – to motivate community members to establish consistent fitness habits.

Still, it seems that there’s a committed core of couch potatoes who – no matter how I try to motivate them — simply don’t enjoy exercise as much as I think they should.

New research suggests that the problem may lie in their genes.

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New Research on Low Back Pain and Its Treatment

1.  A substantial percentage of low back pain patients (40 – 70%, depending on the measure used) did not show significant clinical improvement after their course of physical therapy.  And, if you smoke or are overweight, the odds are stacked against you even more.

More on adding chiropractic methods to the treatment of low back pain

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2. A patient does better in a pain management program if goals are set based on what’s important for the patient, rather than shooting for a pre-fab set of standardized goals.

More on the importance of personalization in the treatment of low back pain

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3.  Although medical guidelines try to eliminate the use of unnecessary MRI’s, many primary care physicians find it difficult to follow the guidelines.

More on unnecessary MRI’s

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Craniosacral Therapy: More is More? Or Less is More?

There are two opposite philosophies about trying to heal the body: “more is more” vs. “less is more”.

I used to be most comfortable with a “more is more” approach. I wanted to give my patients the benefit of all of my knowledge, and heap on the entire range of my therapeutic methods, convinced that the more I added, the quicker they’d get better.

But that was before I got trained in Craniosacral Therapy (in the late 1980’s) and began to listen to the feedback I got from my patients.

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